Balms and Salves

Like a lotion, but a balm requires friction and must be rubbed or massaged into the skin for proper application. Mainly used to relieve pain and stiffness such as sore muscles or arthritis. Salves are thicker than balms and are sometimes used as an adhesive to apply further medicinal items.

Base Recipe

  • 8 oz herbal infused oil(s)

  • 1 oz beeswax

  • 10-20 drops essential oil (optional)

Place oils and wax in double boiler and heat until melted. Remove from heat and add essential oil(s). Pour into containers while still hot.

Organized Alphabetically

Calendula Salve

From: Medicinal Herbs: A Beginner's Guide by Rosemary Gladstar

  • Prep time: 1 hour

  • Shelf life: Year

  • Uses: Rashes, wounds, and cuts

Ingredients

  • 1 cup Calendula Oil (see Herbal Oils)

  • 1/4 cup grated beeswax

  • 4-6 drops lavender essential oil

  • 1 pinch turmeric root powder (for color)

Making

  1. Warm the oil over very low heat and stir in most of the beeswax, reserving just a tablespoon. Check your consistency and adjust as needed.

  2. When salve is at desired consistency, add the essential oil, using more or less depending on the strength of the scent you prefer. Stir in turmeric to enhance the orange color.

  3. Poor into small jars or tins. Let cool, then put the lids on the jars and store in a cool, dark location, where the salve will keep for at least a year.

Using

Apply small amount to skin for rashes, wounds, cuts, diaper rash, or cradle cap. Massage gently into affected area.

Mullein-Red Clover Salve

From: Medicinal Herbs: A Beginner's Guide by Rosemary Gladstar

  • Prep time: 3 weeks to 1 hour

  • Shelf life: Year

  • Uses: Congestion and swelling

Ingredients

  • 1 part calendula flowers

  • 1 part mullein leaf

  • 1 part red clover flower and leaf

  • 1/2 part mullein flower

  • olive oil

  • grated beeswax

Making

  1. Infuse hears in oil, following instructions in Herbal Oils.

  2. When the herbal oil is ready, warm the oil over very low heat and stir in most of the beeswax, reserving just a tablespoon. Check your consistency and adjust as needed.

  3. When salve is at desired consistency, add the essential oil, using more or less depending on the strength of the scent you prefer. Stir in turmeric to enhance the orange color.

  4. Poor into small jars or tins. Let cool, then put the lids on the jars and store in a cool, dark location, where the salve will keep for at least a year.

Using

Apply this salve topically to treat congestion and swelling.

St. John's Wort Salve

From: Medicinal Herbs: A Beginner's Guide by Rosemary Gladstar

  • Prep time: 3 weeks to 1 hour

  • Shelf life: Year

  • Uses: Rashes, burns, cuts, and wounds

Ingredients

  • 1 part calendula flowers

  • 1 part comfrey leaf

  • 1 part St. John's wort leaf and flower

  • olive oil

  • grated beeswax

Making

  1. Infuse hears in oil, following instructions in Herbal Oils.

  2. When the herbal oil is ready, warm the oil over very low heat and stir in most of the beeswax, reserving just a tablespoon. Check your consistency and adjust as needed.

  3. When salve is at desired consistency, add the essential oil, using more or less depending on the strength of the scent you prefer. Stir in turmeric to enhance the orange color.

  4. Poor into small jars or tins. Let cool, then put the lids on the jars and store in a cool, dark location, where the salve will keep for at least a year.

Using

Apply this salve onto wounds, cuts, burns, or any skin injury that needs healing.

In order to test the consistency of your balm, use the freezer trick: 1. As soon as the beeswax has melted, put a tablespoon of the mix on a plate in the freezer for a minute or two to check the consistency.

  1. If you decide you want a firmer salve, add more beeswax. If you want a softer salve, add a little more oil.